Showing posts with label Artemis Aerospace. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Artemis Aerospace. Show all posts

Friday, 1 July 2022

How aircraft withstand tough weather conditions



Weathering the storm: how aircraft withstand tough weather conditions


 

Every day, aircraft encounter turbulence caused by inclement and unsettled weather. While no pilot will voluntarily fly through a storm, aircraft still need to be able to cope with unpredictable weather-related events.  Here, the experts at Artemis Aerospace look at how aircraft are engineered to endure difficult conditions and the skills all pilots need to successfully
navigate storms.

 

Stress testing to the extreme

It’s no coincidence that flying is the safest form of long-distance transport. Safety has always been the highest priority for the aviation industry and serious incidents involving aircraft are rare.

 

The complexity of modern-day aircraft means new planes undergo a series of lengthy and rigorous tests. These tests, which include emulating situations like bird strikes, are constantly evolving to address changes in aircraft design and the potential hazards an aircraft might encounter.

 

Past incidents caused by technical faults, fatigued fuselage and thunderstorms have also contributed greatly to the development of aircraft engineering and maintenance procedures, triggering major technological advances to ensure similar incidents never occur again.

 

In addition to the extensive and extreme testing aircraft undergo before they make it into the air, commercial aircraft are also subject to maintenance and visual inspections from engineers and pilots during each flight turnaround as well as undergoing basic maintenance inspections every two days and more thorough inspections every few years. Maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) services are an essential element of ensuring aircraft remain safe and ready to fly at all times.

 

Tackling turbulence

If you’ve been on an aircraft, then the chances are you have experienced turbulence. While it can be nerve-racking, turbulence, put simply, is an irregular flow of air. Much like the waves of an ocean, which can sometimes be big and erratic, the bumpiness and drops of turbulence aren’t necessarily dangerous.  

 

There are three types of turbulence that aircraft encounter: shear (when two adjacent areas of air are moving in different directions), thermal conditions (a clash between warmer and cooler air) or mechanical, caused by a variation in the landscape – for example, flying over a large mountain.

 

Wings that bend

Wings on modern-day passenger jets are extremely bendy, making them highly resistant to turbulence.

 

To test their resilience, wings are bent to nearly 90 degrees using a specialist rig – far more flex than any aircraft is ever likely to encounter.

 

Wings and fuselage are also subject to load tests of up to 1.5 times higher than they would be subjected to during a flight.

 

Snap tests are also performed on wings to determine their breaking point and ensure it is well beyond the predicted level.

 

Stormy waters

Large amounts of water caused by heavy rain could spell disaster for aircraft. Therefore, aircraft are put through a series of thorough water tests, including having to taxi through specially made water troughs, or forcing a steady stream of water or firing loosely compacted ice into the engines to mimic rain and hail. This enables engineers to establish how the engines, thrust reversers and braking systems will function following water exposure and how this would affect an aircraft having to contend with bad weather.

 

Wild wind

People from all over the world were captivated by Big Jet TV’s coverage of aircraft struggling to land at Heathrow Airport during Storm Eunice.

 

For passengers and spectators on the ground, strong winds, which cause aircraft to sway back and forth, can seem alarming and feel precarious for those onboard.

Pilots are experts in navigating turbulence and poor weather conditions. Regular flight simulator training sessions mean pilots are well-versed in every type of situation they might encounter during a flight, including stormy weather or landing in windy conditions.

 

Airlines and airports will also have their own set wind speed limits in place – if the wind is too strong, then aircraft will not be allowed to take-off or land. Indeed, many flights from Heathrow were cancelled during Storm Eunice while others had to perform go-arounds or diversions. Airport operations are strictly regulated to ensure the safety of all passengers and crew.

 

While there is no single maximum wind limit, as it depends on the direction of wind and phase of the flight, a crosswind (winds perpendicular to the runway) above 40mph and a tailwind of more than 10mph are considered problematic. Limits will also depend on aircraft type, runway direction and general weather conditions.

 

During the testing phase, aircraft will be subjected to specially made wind tunnels to assess their strength in extreme conditions. For example, Boeing’s Test and Evaluation department’s tunnel can test speeds between 60 and 250 knots (70 and 290mph). This facility simulates many kinds of rain, ice and cloud conditions that aircraft might come across.

 

Thursday, 19 May 2022

Let's go inside the world of aircraft simulator creation.....


Dan Frith, Flight Simulator Support & Sales Director at component solutions experts Artemis Aerospace, takes us inside the world of aircraft simulator creation.  
Photo Artemis Aerospace

 Since simulators were first used to assist pilots with mastering simple aircraft manoeuvres in the early 1900s, they have evolved into the fully equipped and highly technical pieces of kit that are used worldwide today.


Their use in modern aircraft training is now crucial for pilots and airlines. When incidents in the air occur, it's largely the actions of the pilot that determine whether a flight lands safely or becomes a fatal situation. Simulators allow pilots to safely train for every possible eventuality, including engine failures, tyre blowouts, difficult weather conditions and bird strikes.


Flight simulators can also assist investigators, helping them to make sense of accidents after they occur while providing evidence that pilots were not at fault and did their utmost to protect passengers and crew.


Most recently, this was demonstrated following the famously flawless landing of US Airways Flight 1549 by Captain Chesley 'Sully' Sullenberger, and first officer Jeffrey Skiles. Sully and Skiles ditched their aircraft in New York's Hudson River, saving all 155 people on board, after a freak bird strike took out both engines. In the months that followed, investigators used simulator re-enactments that helped to eventually prove the pilots had made the correct decision to land on water rather than attempt to return to a nearby airport. This shows how invaluable simulator training is for pilots and how essential it is to investigating incidents in the sky.


Early simulators were basic. One of the best-known devices was the Link Trainer, produced by Edwin Link in the US in 1927. This comprised a basic metal frame painted in blue with a pneumatic motion platform driven by inflatable bellows to provide pitch and roll cues.


Initially, little interest was shown in simulators until World War II, when the Link Trainer became the principal pilot trainer. Around 10,000 were produced to train more than 500,000 pilots from the allied nations.



In 1954, the first of four simulators produced by Curtiss-Wright were bought by United Airlines at a cost of US$3 million. Similar to early models, these simulators had the added benefit of visuals, sound and movement. They became the first examples of the modern flight simulators used for commercial aircraft.


Standardising flight simulators


Initially, flight simulators weren't regulated and, even for the same aircraft type, there were no two identical simulators. This issue caused concern for pilots and regulators, eventually leading to a technical committee being set up under the umbrella of the IATA (International Air Transport Association) and an internationally recognised system of simulator standards and certifications was subsequently put in place.


Types of simulators


Depending on the purpose there are three types of simulators: ATD (Aviation Training Device), FTD (Flight Training Device) and FFS (Full Flight Simulators). Pilots are required to test their skills in various situations regularly.

Artemis Aerospace looks inside the world of aircraft simulator creation

Dan Frith, Flight Simulator Support & Sales Director at component solutions experts Artemis Aerospace, takes us inside the world of aircraft simulator creation.  

 Since simulators were first used to assist pilots with mastering simple aircraft manoeuvres in the early 1900s, they have evolved into the fully equipped and highly technical pieces of kit that are used worldwide today.


Their use in modern aircraft training is now crucial for pilots and airlines. When incidents in the air occur, it's largely the actions of the pilot that determine whether a flight lands safely or becomes a fatal situation. Simulators allow pilots to safely train for every possible eventuality, including engine failures, tyre blowouts, difficult weather conditions and bird strikes.


Flight simulators can also assist investigators, helping them to make sense of accidents after they occur while providing evidence that pilots were not at fault and did their utmost to protect passengers and crew.


Most recently, this was demonstrated following the famously flawless landing of US Airways Flight 1549 by Captain Chesley 'Sully' Sullenberger, and first officer Jeffrey Skiles. Sully and Skiles ditched their aircraft in New York's Hudson River, saving all 155 people on board, after a freak bird strike took out both engines. In the months that followed, investigators used simulator re-enactments that helped to eventually prove the pilots had made the correct decision to land on water rather than attempt to return to a nearby airport. This shows how invaluable simulator training is for pilots and how essential it is to investigating incidents in the sky.


Early simulators were basic. One of the best-known devices was the Link Trainer, produced by Edwin Link in the US in 1927. This comprised a basic metal frame painted in blue with a pneumatic motion platform driven by inflatable bellows to provide pitch and roll cues.


Initially, little interest was shown in simulators until World War II, when the Link Trainer became the principal pilot trainer. Around 10,000 were produced to train more than 500,000 pilots from the allied nations.

Photo Artemis Aerospace


In 1954, the first of four simulators produced by Curtiss-Wright were bought by United Airlines at a cost of US$3 million. Similar to early models, these simulators had the added benefit of visuals, sound and movement. They became the first examples of the modern flight simulators used for commercial aircraft.


Standardising flight simulators


Initially, flight simulators weren't regulated and, even for the same aircraft type, there were no two identical simulators. This issue caused concern for pilots and regulators, eventually leading to a technical committee being set up under the umbrella of the IATA (International Air Transport Association) and an internationally recognised system of simulator standards and certifications was subsequently put in place.


Types of simulators


Depending on the purpose there are three types of simulators: ATD (Aviation Training Device), FTD (Flight Training Device) and FFS (Full Flight Simulators). Pilots are required to test their skills in various situations regularly.

Wednesday, 4 May 2022

High-flyers: five careers in aviation that don’t require a pilot’s licence

High-flyers: five careers in aviation that don’t require a pilot’s licence


 
A career in aviation is a dream for many aircraft and aerospace enthusiasts. While becoming a pilot is high on the agenda for most people, the aviation industry has a plethora of potential employment positions to choose from that offer interesting and exciting careers.

Here, we round up a few of the lesser-known roles and explain what makes them great long-term career opportunities.



Aircraft maintenance engineer


Regular aircraft maintenance is imperative to making sure planes are operating safely. Aircraft maintenance engineers or mechanics are responsible for checking the systems on aeroplanes in between flights to ensure they are fit to fly. It’s a highly skilled job with a great deal of responsibility. Successful candidates will need to have meticulous attention to detail and obtain specific qualifications as well as a special licence from the CAA granting them permission to operate.

There are two types of maintenance: line maintenance, such as pre-flight checks and refuelling, and base maintenance work, which is undertaken in an aircraft hangar and involves more complex checks and diagnoses.

You can choose to work in one of two areas: mechanics or avionics. Mechanics involves servicing the fuselage, engines, landing gear and airframe systems as well as any associated electrics. Alternatively, avionics covers the electronic systems that power the navigation, communications and flight control systems.


Jobs are available in the commercial and private sectors as well as the military. Engineers are required to work on rotating shifts, so it is likely that you will need to work weekends and overnight as part of the shift pattern.

Becoming an aircraft maintenance engineer takes lots of time and dedication and you will need to obtain relevant engineering qualifications. If you excel in maths, physics and technology subjects, like engineering science, and enjoy problem-solving this could be the career for you.
 

Component sourcing account manager


Aircraft maintenance managers and engineers need to find replacement parts from somewhere. Time is critical – while an aircraft remains on the ground, it isn’t earning. This is where component sourcing solutions companies, like Artemis Aerospace, come in.

Tom Shadbolt supports lessors and investors with their aircraft component supplies and repairs needs. He has worked at Artemis Aerospace for eight years. He explains more about his day-to-day work:

“My job is a huge balancing act of making sure I meet the needs of multiple customers and their, often very short, deadlines each day. For lessors and investors, they are usually preparing aircraft to be moved on to the next airline so the window of time to undertake a project is usually quite small – while their aircraft isn’t leased, it means they are losing money! It pays to be extremely organised, and I often need to think fast.

“I will start my day by picking up on all the requests that have come in overnight. This can be anything from basic switches to cabin interiors, hydraulic components or critical computing and indication systems. With the support of my team, we then get to work sourcing these parts using our global network of suppliers and preparing quotes. Meanwhile, I am managing other ongoing projects to ensure my customers get their aircraft delivered on time. Every day, I get ad hoc requests due to new discoveries made by maintenance teams.”

Tom, who formerly worked in administration for a pharmaceutical company, says it is a great job with so much opportunity to progress: “I didn’t have any experience in aircraft parts before I joined Artemis. I came in on day one and learned completely on the job.”

Logistics is also a really important element of the role.

“I am often having to work out the best, most cost-effective as well as fastest solution to get parts from one place to another,” said Tom.

Why does Tom enjoy his job so much? “It’s so varied and fast-paced – it’s certainly diverse with new things happening every day! I also take great pleasure in helping my customers and doing the very best I can for them. It’s always a real achievement when another project has been completed and an aircraft has been moved on to its new home.”

Monday, 21 February 2022

Artemis Aerospace discusses aviation in the post-pandemic era and why now is the time for optimism

Jim Scott, the owner of components solutions experts Artemis Aerospace, discusses how he sees the aviation industry adapting and emerging from the COVID-19 crisis.



The pandemic has changed the aviation industry irrevocably. Unlike any other crisis in the sector's history, COVID-19 not only grounded numerous aircraft, wiped billions from industry revenues and cost 200 million jobs, but it also fundamentally changed consumer behaviour overnight.

However, despite these extraordinary setbacks and unparalleled circumstances, as we emerge and recover from the pandemic, one thing has become clear: the aviation industry has a unique opportunity for transformation.

The acceleration of some technological advances that were already in the pipeline, such as automation, along with new business models and growing travel demand are sparking the dawn of a new era – one that ultimately has efficiency and environment at its heart.



Automation – increasing efficiency in a restricted world


While automation has long been a buzzword in the world of aviation, technological advances and investment in automated services for both the commercial and cargo sectors have surged over the last couple of years.

Automated innovations have been crucial to maintaining operations throughout the pandemic, instilling passenger confidence and creating safer working environments for employees across the board. There is no doubt that automated innovations will continue to evolve as we navigate the new aviation ecosystem.

From touchless check-ins to contactless immigration and supply chain support, automation in a post-pandemic world will generate greater efficiency and help to solve many of the challenges we face going forwards as we work towards getting back to pre-pandemic levels of business.

Transforming the business model