Saturday, 23 December 2017

EasyJet asked to be a German feeder airline at Berlin

 EasyJet's Europe boss says the airline has been approached to be a provider of feeder flights from Berlin’s Tegel airport to the long-haul routes for other airlines.

“We have already had very many enquiries from other airlines that want to use our flights as feeders,” Thomas Haagensen told German newspaper daily Berliner Morgenpost on Saturday. The comments come after EasyJet began the process of taking over some of the failed German airline Air Berlin’s operations at Berlin's Tegel Airport.  The orange budget brand will be taking over the leases for around twenty-five Airbus A320 aircraft as well as a large number of slots at the airport.  Apparently, according to the newspaper, easyJet had already taken on, subject to contract, some 500 former Air Berlin staff in the region. 

The prospect of being or becoming a feeder airline within Europe is not wholly unexpected, indeed a number of airlines have looked into this prospect. Ryanair, Wizz, easyJet and others have all investigated various feeder operations within Europe within the last couple of years.  

Indeed, easyJet is already trying to turn itself into a 'feeder' type airline at London Gatwick this year, with the introduction of a new booking website specifically aimed at making it 'easier' for passengers to connect from easyJet services to those offered by its long-haul partners like WestJet and Norweigan. Although, using the new platform passengers end up paying more for their tickets, plus a connecting fee and it takes a great deal longer than the published minimum connecting times at Gatwick for other airlines.  




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